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You’re Building a New Home…Where Do You Put Your Septic Tank?

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Many DIYers are surprised to learn that several factors need to be considered before deciding on the right spot to install a new septic system. While working with a certified professional is the best way to ensure the installation process is done properly in a safe and sanitary location, here are a few things to consider if you choose to go it alone.

FIRST THINGS FIRST, CHECK YOUR LOCAL REGULATIONS.

Septic system regulations vary depending on where you live. Start by contacting your local regulating agency to review the installation policies for your area and apply for the necessary permit(s). In the state of Arizona, this process begins with filing a Notice of Intent (NOI) to Discharge.

ALWAYS CBYD (CALL BEFORE YOU DIG).

The last thing you want to do is start digging and hit a utility line (e.g. cable, gas, power). Not only can this delay installation, but it can also be extremely dangerous—and potentially very expensive. Because there are no hard and fast rules about how deep different utilities have to be buried, make sure you call and have someone come out to mark the area. In most areas, a simple 811 call can get you started.

TAKE A GOOD LOOK AT THE TERRAIN.

A little common sense goes a long way here. Ideally, you want to place your septic system on level ground (and high ground if possible) to avoid flooding and seeping. Avoid steep slopes and areas of dense tree roots or other obstructions. Also, because you will be bringing in heavy equipment to install your system, take into consideration any surrounding structures (such as utility sheds) or power lines that may impede your progress.

REMEMBER TO TEST THE SOIL QUALITY.

The quality of the surrounding soil is an important factor in determining where to place your septic tank. Consider how a septic system works: wastewater runs from your home to the septic tank, where it separates from solid waste and is released into the surrounding drain field, also called a leach field. Essentially, the drain field acts like a giant soil filter, so it’s important that your soil is highly absorbent. The best type of soil is sandy, undisturbed soil. Try to avoid areas of dense clay or bedrock, which can prevent water flow. Also steer clear of coarse, gravely soils that may drain too quickly. A percolation test (or perc test for short) will help you determine the state of your soil.

WHY GO IT ALONE? THE EXPERTS AT PARADISE VALLEY SEPTIC CAN HELP.

We touched on just a few of the important things to think about before installing your home septic system, but you also need to think about things like materials (what kind and how much will you need?), the overall design (how large of a drain field do you need? how close to your home should it be?), and the list goes on.

Or, you could just leave it to the professionals.

At Paradise Valley Septic our experienced technicians support ALL your septic system needs from installation to repair, including helping you with your initial design and securing the necessary permits. Just give us a call when you’re ready to get started.

How Long Will Your Septic System Last?

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It would be nice if septic system owners could just flush waste down the drain and not worry about what happens afterwards, but alas, that is not the case.

If you want to get the most out of your septic system investment—and prevent flushing cash down the drain—you must research how to properly treat and maintain your system before problems arise.

There are many steps to be taken to help your system live up to its full potential and reach its maximum intended lifespan. How long your septic system will last depends on many factors, specifically the type of system you have and the conditions surrounding it.

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How Much will it Cost to Have My Septic Tank Pumped?

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If you know even a little bit about septic tanks, hopefully it’s that having them pumped at regular intervals is as necessary as having your car’s oil changed or keeping your roof in good repair: ignoring any of them will inevitably result in serious expense and hassle.

In fact, replacing a septic system can run between $5000 and $10,000. The good news is, depending on system type, tank material and soil quality, well-maintained septic systems can last 25, 30 or even 50 years.

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6 Ways to Keep Your Drainfield Healthy Paradise Valley Septic

6 Ways to Keep Your Drainfield Healthy

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A septic system is a complicated beast. It’s in our best interest to keep that beast happy, healthy and in good working order.

In a septic system’s elimination process, the drainfield serves as the beast’s digestive system. What goes in, must come out. Everything that goes down the drain gets sorted and eventually makes its way to the drainfield, where nature takes over. It’s really an amazing process.

But, in order to keep things working smoothly, we must keep the drainfield healthy. Here are six ways to do just that:

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7 Signs You Need to Pump Your Septic Tank

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When you are taking care of your home, you’ll find that some things have a way of telling you when they need something. Your ceiling leaks if your roof needs a patch, your lawnmower starts chugging if it’s clogged with grass, your hinges squeak when they need oil and your septic tank . . . well, let’s just say it works harder than most when it’s trying desperately to tell you it needs to be pumped.

And that’s a good thing, because the repercussions of a seldom-pumped septic tank can be severe. Septic tanks need to be pumped periodically in order to get rid of solid waste deposits that form on the bottom and top of your tank and put life-shortening stress on your entire septic system.

Many times septic tank additives are marketed to homeowners as a solution or substitute for pumping your septic tank. They are composed of bacteria or enzymes that claim to help soften or break down waste. Unfortunately, sometimes the the bacteria can cause more harm or add to your septic tank problems by delaying or masking problems. Research has shown there is no substitute for getting your septic tank pumped. Septic tank maintenance should become a part of your regular home maintenance.

Septic tanks are often neglected by homeowners because they are underground and out of sight. Just because you haven’t had any septic tank problems, does not mean you should neglect the maintenance schedule.

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7 Signs You Have a Serious Drainfield Problem

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We ask a lot of our septic systems. From washing laundry, to doing the dishes, to flushing the toilet, most of our everyday household activities put a strain on the system. And using too much water can seriously affect one of its most important parts—the drainfield. Continue reading “7 Signs You Have a Serious Drainfield Problem” »

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Septic System Installation: Why You Should Leave it to the Professionals

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Building your own home on bare land is a romantic idea that many people fall in love with. But when it comes to installing your septic system, it is essential to leave it to a contracted professional.

Just the maintenance of a septic system can be a hazardous and dangerous undertaking, let alone its installation. Beyond that, here are some of the major reasons you should consider a professional.
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Your Septic System has Bacteria: Why That’s a Good Thing

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It’s true: there is bacteria in your septic system. In fact, it has a large impact on how well your septic system will perform. Many of the problems people have with their septic systems, such as pungent odors, gurgling and sucking noises, and frequent stoppages, can be linked to a lack of bacteria in their septic system.

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