What’s-the-Connection-Here-Is-Why-Its-So-Important

Water Conservation and Septic Systems: What’s the Connection? Here Is Why It’s So Important

At first glance, water conservation seems simple enough: Use less water, save more water.

There’s a lot more to it, though. Water conservation isn’t just about reducing water usage; it’s also about using water efficiently. In other words, when water is used, it should be done in a resourceful way.

After all, Mother Nature doesn’t have an unlimited supply. And if we’re not mindful of our demands, we can easily exhaust our resources.

You can make a difference, though. As a homeowner, the way you care for your septic system a tank that treats wastewater will influence the integrity of local sources.

It comes down to learning why water conservation is so important, how your system influences the environment, and the steps you can take to protect it.

 

THE CONNECTION BETWEEN WATER CONSERVATION AND SEPTIC SYSTEMS

Did you know that a septic tank can contaminate local water?

If you overload your septic system, it won’t be able to properly treat wastewater. This is a likely result of heavy water use. In turn, wastewater can leech into the soil and pollute nearby lakes, streams, and even drinking sources.

However, if you conserve water, your septic system is less likely to overload. You’ll also avoid issues like drainfield problems, clogged pipes, and the risk of water pollution.

Needless to say, your septic tank can significantly impact the water in your community.

 

HOW CAN I CONSERVE WATER AT HOME?

Water conservation doesn’t have to expensive or complicated. With these simple tips, you and your family can save water and the environment.

1. AVOID UNNECESSARY FLUSHING

The toilet is one of the biggest sources of wastewater. So, only flush when you need to.

This also means tossing the trash in the wastebasket when possible. (Don’t forget, solids and septic systems do not mix literally!)

2. FIX LEAKS

A leaky faucet can waste at least 10 gallons of water each day. In the same time frame, a leaky toilet can waste hundreds of gallons of water. This adds up quickly, and your wallet will be the first to know.

If you’re the DIY type, fix leaky fixtures. You can also call a plumber. It may feel like a chore, but the effort will be worth it.

3. TAKE SHOWERS, NOT BATHS

Baths might be relaxing, but they’re costly. Just one bath can use about 60 gallons of water. Meanwhile, a quick five-minute shower only calls for 10 to 25 gallons.

4. FILL UP WASHING MACHINES AND DISHWASHERS    

When doing laundry or using a dishwasher, run a full load to make the most out of the water. This is especially important if you have older machines.

If you own newer models, take advantage of energy and water saving features. Adjust the settings according to the size of your load so you can avoid excess water usage.

5. RECYCLE WATER

Make it a habit to re-use water. For example, after boiling vegetables, let the water cool and save it for the plants. When rinsing dishes, collect the water and use it to soak dirty ones.

 

6. INSTALL WATER-SAVING DEVICES

From low-flow shower heads to sink faucet aerators, it’s possible to reduce how much water runs through your fixtures. In fact, these devices can save up to 50%! They also won’t negatively affect water pressure.

 

REGULAR SEPTIC MAINTENANCE MAKES A DIFFERENCE, TOO.

Now that you know how to conserve water, you don’t have to worry about your system overflowing and polluting the environment… right? Not necessarily.  

Remember, your septic system isn’t an endless pit. It has a limit on how much wastewater it can hold, so it’s bound to fill up over time. And when it does? You’ll have clogged pipes, standing water, and the risk of polluting local sources.

Reducing water usage is just one part of preventing overflow. Your septic system also needs to be regularly pumped. This is normal, routine maintenance that should be done every one to three years, depending on household size and usage.

 

TOGETHER, WE CAN PROTECT OUR LOCAL WATER SOURCES.
When you stay on top of tank inspections and regular pumping, your septic system will run smoothly. As a result, it will treat your family and environment well.

Paradise Valley Septic is here to lend a hand. Since 1958, we have served Phoenix Valley and the surrounding areas. Our team of experts can find and stop septic problems before they begin.

To contact Paradise Valley Septic, send us a message or call us at 480-351-1725 today.

admin

About admin